Angus

Polly Tatum's grandparents, David and Minnie Lamb, acquired Angus in 1938 when they retired from lifelong service in the Salvation Army.  Minnie Lamb, a Cornishwoman, died there in April 1939.   Polly was told by the late Shirley Allen (who lived for a time at Daymer...

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Beniguet

Beniguet is one of the houses in Trebetherick which has stayed in the same family for almost seventy years. The house was built in 1934, the first on the cliffs above Trebetherick Point, by Mr and Mrs Greenshields, apple farmers from Somerset.    They had to build a...

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Brayfield

Brayfield was built in 1978 by the Gerrish family, who came from near Reading where Mr Gerrish was a coal merchant.  The first entry in the Land Registry appeared in 1923 when the land was acquired by Mr Francis Mably from Viscount Clifden of Lanhydrock, and it...

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Cobb Cottage

Cobb Cottage is one of the oldest buildings in Trebetherick.  The original cottage, as seen from the lane, is uppermost, the rest having been added on in the last thirty years.  It was a two-up two-down cottage, the last in a row of six built probably about 1780.  In...

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Daymer Cottage

Daymer Cottage was built in 1987 by Dr Colin Hallward and his wife Diana, on land which was previously the bottom of Whitebays' garden.   They actually acquired the site in 1975 from Hugh and Nancy Edwards, and first of all put up a well-built solid boathouse, at the...

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Daymer Dunes

Daymer Dunes was built between the wars by Mrs Borrie (Ruth May, nee Downing), who was then living at Daymer Bay House, though she moved to Daymer Dunes in the early 1950s.  Mrs Borrie was herself brought up in New Polzeath, where her parents had built Medla, one of...

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Doom Bar House

Doom Bar House was built in 1934 for Mr and Mrs Anthony Jeffreys, on land that had formed part of Lower Farm, on Daymer Lane.  The builder was Lewis Brown from Wadebridge, who was responsible for many of the houses in Trebetherick; he used concrete blocks in the...

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Drumtarlie

Drumtarlie was built in the late 1930s by Mr and Mrs Greenshield, who owned several acres of land to the east of Fishing Cove Field and had previously built Beniguet slightly further away from the cliff top. They had been apple farmers in Somerset. When the...

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Grey Ladies

Grey Ladies was built by Ernest Betjemann, the Poet Laureate’s father, on part of a field known as Well Park, bought from Robert Darell Smythe Darell (of Trewornon) in 1918. The architect was Robert Atkinson FRIBA, OBE, who had also designed Undertown in 1928. Grey...

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Higher Farm

By the early years of the twentieth century there were only three arable farms based in Trebetherick, out of the six recorded in earlier times. These were Higher Farm, at the top of the hill, Lower Farm on the lane down to the beach, and Trenain Farm on the way to...

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Little Torquil

The house now known as Little Torquil was built originally in the 1920's as the garage to Torquil.  Elsie McCorkindale loved driving, and owned one of the first motor vehicles in Trebetherick – a Talbot-Darracq – of which she was very proud. John Betjeman's Summoned...

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Rocket House

The ‘Life Saving Apparatus House’ as it is called on a 1908 map of Trebetherick is next to what were originally coastguard cottages – now Tregawne and Upalong. Nearly 400 ships are recorded as having got into difficulties in the Camel estuary since 1618, most during...

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Stepper

Ralph Barlow, a schoolmaster at Sherborne School, bought Stepper in 1937 for £1,500. It was the first house built on the Greenaway cliff by Lewis Brown of Wadebridge who was responsible for most of the houses built in that area, all of them subject to certain specific...

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The Close

The area of houses at the bottom of Worthy Hill now called The Close was originally agricultural land, and known as Lower Trebetherick.  In 1885, five years before he died, Robert Stephens of Trewornon bequeathed his farm, land, buildings and share of other...

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Torquil Cottage

In 1838 Cob Cottage was standing at the end of a row of 6 cottages extending down the  lane.  There was a gap and then 2 more cottages, which now are incorporated in Torquil Cottage. (extract from Mary Fellgett's history) Elsie McCorkindale bought the land on which...

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Trebarbill

Trebarbill was built in 1952 by Emily Lander for her daughter Sylvia and son-in-law Roy Dingle (1915-78). Their second child Barbara was actually born in the house, only weeks after it was completed. So the new house was named after the couple’s two children, Bill and...

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Trefelix

Trefelix was built by Sir John and Lady Walsham in 1927, on retirement from China.  They had been visiting Trebetherick over many years, as Lady Walsham's sister Ursula Warren lived at Torquil with Elsie McCorkindale; there are photos of the two Walsham children,...

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Undertown

Having stayed in the early days at The Haven, and then rented Linkside in subsequent summers, Ernest Betjemann decided in 1928 to build his own house in Trebetherick.  Undertown was designed by the architect Robert Atkinson, a golfing chum of Ernest’s – as “a last...

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White Horses

White Horses was built in 1938 by Lewis Brown, who had bought the land at Trebetherick Point from Ernest Betjeman, the Poet Laureate’s father – he had imposed a covenant on all new building that each house should cost no less than £2,500, to ensure quality. White...

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White Wings

White Wings was built in 1937 for Mr and Mrs Reginald Gwinn, on land previously owned by Mrs Bessie Betjeman, the Poet Laureate's mother.  They used White Wings initially as their holiday retreat, moving down to Trebetherick permanently after the Second World War. Mr...

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Whitebays

Whitebays was built in 1935 by Mrs Nell Oakley, MBE. She had come to Trebetherick first in 1919, renting St Enodoc Cottage for six weeks over the summer holidays, spent there with her two children Joan and Roland and her sister Kathleen Stokes and her two children,...

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